Ossie Dellimore

Ossie Dellimore, together with the Soldiers of Justice, create a powerful ambience of love and unfaltering consciousness as well as a superb contribution to world of roots rock reggae. From St. Vincent, Ossie Dellimore’s tenor voice is strong and confident as it delivers the conscious messages within his lyrics.

Several tracks on his album “Freedoms Journal” that are worth mention, and the bass lines on this CD are bold, driving the music at a rock-steady pace. It is surprising to see what talented artistes are out there if care enough to look. This is not one of those CDs that you buy for just one song. Almost every track is a concrete example of what modern roots rock reggae is at its best.

The disc starts off with “The System,” introduced with grinding keyboards and funky guitar that set the standard of musicianship the Soldiers of Justice bring to every song on this album. The lyrics bring up many very crucial questions like, “Is it a part of the plan?” After having I consciousness raised by the first track, Ossie Dellimore follows with the uplifting reminder that divine justice will never fail I N I in “Fire Man.”

Now, behold the beauty of “Time Has Come,” a song calling for Jah truth to be handed on to the youths in abundance. “Solomon Dub” follows with a first-rate mix of the instrumental of the prior track, allowing for continued meditations on the lyrics of “Time Has Come.” Fast forward a track, and you will find that it is not all seriousness. “Rocker Reggae” is fun track that shows the carefree side of Ossie Dellimore. For those imprisoned spiritually, mentally, and or physically, lend an ear to “Got to Be Free.” If you enjoyed Peter Tosh’s version you will also apprecilove Ossie’s “Downpressor Man.” Once again, Ossie blesses the mic with the lyrics of “A Better Way,” a song about what most are looking for, and even an answer to finding a better way. “We got show it in the lives we lead.” Another uplifting reminder of what is to come is explored in the sounds of “Justice.” On the rougher side of the spectrum, the album finishes off “Sharp as a Razor” and “Razor Dub,” a warning unto those who cross this Rastaman. Yeah man, this album is not for the slight of heart soldiers of Babylon.

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